czech-republicThe Czech Republic is a landlocked European country. Its geographical location is rather unique, similar to a central meeting point for the well-developed Western Europe (with Germany in the west and Austria in the south), and relatively less developed, former Soviet Bloc Eastern Europe (with Poland in the north and Slovakia in the east). The population of the Czech Republic, which joined the European Union (EU) in 2004, and is economically considered as a developed country, is about 10.5 million (2012). The name of its capital is Prague. The country has earned global respect for its high-rated human development index, peaceful coexistence, democratic governance, and liberal economic policies that include, among other initiatives, privatization of key sectors like banks and telecommunications. The Czech Republic has an active program of development cooperation and humanitarian aid, which is operated by the Czech Development Agency. For administrative purposes, the country is divided into 13 regions, each having its own elected assembly.

title=Context

Context

Although the Czech Republic is landlocked, its rivers end up in three different seas, namely Baltic Sea, Black Sea and the North Sea. Its climate is temperate continental, with hot summers and snowy winters. A third of the country is covered by forests. A rather slow process of breaking up Communist-era collective farms and re-distribution of the land to private owners that started after the country got out of the Soviet Bloc and still continues. According to EU records, in 2007, the average size of land holdings in the Czech Republic was 135 hectares, and 16 per cent of the sole holders were women.

The contribution of the agricultural sector to the national GDP has been steadily declining, but the sector is still considered important for social and environmental reasons, and receives national and/or EU subsidies. The country follows the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). The crops cultivated include wheat, rye, barley, oats, corn, oilseeds, potatoes, grapes, sugar beet, apples, and fodder. Farm animals include cattle, sheep and pigs. The Czech Republic enjoys a long tradition of brewing and consuming beer. Exported agricultural commodities comprise milk, livestock, grain, sugar and malt.

  Key Statistics and Indicators

Indicator

Value

Year  

Agricultural land (sq. km)

Agricultural land (% of land area)

Arable land (hectares)

Arable land (% of land area)

Arable land (hectares per person)

42,290

54.75

3,164,000

40.96

0.30

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

Fertilizer consumption (kg per hectare of arable land)

95.84

2010

Agriculture, value added (% of GDP)

Food production index (2004-2006 = 100)

Food exports (% of merchandise exports)

Food imports (% of merchandise imports)

2.31

98.64

4.70

6.03

2010

2011

2012

2012

GNI per capita, Atlas method (current US$)

18,120

2012

Literacy rate, adult total (% of people ages 15 and above)

Literacy rate, youth female (% of females ages 15-24)

Literacy rate, youth male (% of males ages 15-24)

Ratio of young literate females to males (% ages 15-24)

Ratio of female to male secondary enrollment (%)

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

100.13

2011

Mobile cellular subscriptions (per 100 people)

Internet users (per 100 people)

122.78

75

2012

2012

Population, total

Population density (people per sq. km of land area)

Rural population

Rural population (% of total population)

Agricultural population (% of total population)*

Total economically active population

Total economically active population in agriculture*

Total economically active population in agriculture (in %

    of total economically active population)

Female economically active population in agriculture (% of

     total economically active population in agriculture)*

10,514,810

135.88

2,794,752

26.57

6.18

5,282,718

327,000

6.18

23.24

2012

2011

2012

2012

2011

2012

2010

2011

2010

Sources: The World Bank; *Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO 

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Acknowledgements

  • Authored by M. Kalim Qamar (January 2014)
  • Edited by Burton E. Swanson